First Feed

THE FIRST FEED CAN BE MAKE OR BREAK, AND YOU'RE USUALLY IN NO STATE OF MIND TO PAY ATTENTION.

When your baby is born, the elation is pure ecstasy. Ideally, the first feed happens immediately after birth and your baby is usually pretty good at sucking already. But if they aren't attached right, you could be in for months of healing.

LET'S TALK ABOUT WHY GETTING THE FIRST FEED RIGHT MATTERS.

In our modern world, most women nurse under a cover or in the privacy of their homes, so breastfeeding is often quite foreign to new mums.  If you haven't spent much time thinking or talking about breastfeeding, it's probably worth doing a little bit of preparation before your bub is born.

For some women, the first feed is easy and one of the loveliest experiences of their lives. For other women, the endorphins pumping through their bodies after labour mask a poor latch, resulting in nipple trauma. This bad start can require months of healing down the track. Yes, one feed is all it takes to cause lasting damage. 

The first feed is also important for your baby. It's hungry work being born and that high-fat, antibody-rich colostrum is just what bub needs. This special 'first milk' delivers a nutrient hit to your baby in a super concentrated but low volume form, perfectly suited to a tiny tummy. With a poor latch, your bub will need to work harder for less - as if being born wasn't hard enough!

So, when you first meet your baby and bring him to you chest to feed, make a conscious effort to check for pain or discomfort.  If it doesn't feel right, it's probably not.  

You might feel like you're ruining a sacred moment by asking for practical help, but do it. Getting a good start might make all the difference.